Progress Report (Week 4)

Hello everyone! It’s AJ…back at it again with the blog posts! Here are the team and I’s updates for this week…

  • We started the week by having a meeting on Sunday, September 18, 2016 in which we devised a QA Plan, as we planned on having two separate informal testing sessions on the following day (Monday).
  • To help us prepare to successfully describe each game idea to the testers, we wrote down descriptive words of each idea on the board.
  • Following this, we then discussed all three ideas briefly to flesh them out a little more…
    • For My Prices Are More Than Fair, we decided that it would be more like a Quest Giver game where you send the customers out on quests and equipping them with things they would need (from your inventory). As you progress, you can add more to your shops (i.e. how in real life stores have a bakery section, clothing section, etc.)
    • For Wizards in Training, this idea is pretty fleshed out already, but we talked about art style and how we would like to go a more cartoonish route. We’re still not too sure about the setting.
    • For Warm Fighter, we still want to keep it as a boss rush, but we want to stray away from it being solely that. We suggested levels where the player tries to get to the boss, as well as your hub ship (which was briefly mentioned before).
  • We then spent the remainder of the meeting doing work. Said work was on the prototypes, the QA Plan, and on documents.
  • On Wednesday, September 21, 2016, we called a meeting together to analyze the feedback from our informal testing sessions. To keep it brief, the gist of the feedback are as follows…
    • For Wizards in Training, the feedback was mixed as there were people who liked the concept and there were people who thought it was boring and was very confusing. The negative comments were aimed at the controls as well as the reticle, with one person saying it wasn’t engaging enough.
    • For My Prices Are More Than Fair, most of the feedback was positive, with the majority liking the idea. The only problems that were addressed were that it was a little repetitive and that more needed to be added (which was obvious since this was the first prototype). One tester thought the leveling up was arbitrary and should be organic instead. Another one thought the player should spend the entire game as a back alley, trench-coat merchant instead of upgrading to a cart, then a store, etc. Most people were also worried about this idea (despite liking it) due to the need of an economy system.
    • For Warm Fighter, the responses were mostly positive as a lot of people liked the idea. The negatives here were that some thought it was just a generic shooter (but it’s also a prototype right now too, so..) and that it may have been a little too easy to hide from the boss. One tester preferred that if the game is going to stay a boss rush, then have the player only fight bosses, instead of having small levels before each boss.
  • Following this, some members had to leave, so the remaining members (including myself) created one-paragraph pitches for each idea as well as look at vikings and a rust aesthetic to get ideas for the art style of the Vikings in Warm Fighter.
  • On the following day (Thursday), we had a formal QA session, while simultaneously having a meeting somewhere else. (Half the team went to QA, the other half were at the meeting).
  • The members at the meeting spent the time working to catch up on documents. After about 2 hours, the team members at QA then joined us and we analyzed the feedback from this session. They are as follows…(the only problem was most of the testers were Freshman and were expecting a full game instead of just a rough prototype)
    • The feedback for Wizards in Training were that a lot of people liked the idea, but the controls were a little wonky. Someone did point out that a lot of special effects would be needed for the spells, which can hurt the team. Some people felt the game was a little bare and the camera was a little messy…but it is just a prototype.
    • For My Prices Are More Than Fair, just about everyone loved this idea. One tester said even for a prototype, the world was pretty immersive. Some negatives were that some felt the exploring part should be taken out (which we had already planned on doing), as well as some people thought it was a little repetitive with finding items, then selling them, and repeat.
    • For Warm Fighter, a lot of people liked this idea as well, with many enjoying the boss fight and praising the animation. Some negatives were that some thought the game was too difficult at first, and most didn’t know the concept of the Heat bar. The testers who didn’t find it difficult had found strategies to make the boss fight easier (such as hiding behind certain pillars).
  • In the QA Feedback Form, we asked each tester to rate each idea out of 10. After taking the averages of the scores, Wizards in Training came in last with an average of 6.1/10, Warm Fighter came in second with an average of 6.3/10, and My Prices Are More Than Fair was the most liked idea with an average of 7.2/10. This won’t decide which idea the team chooses to move forward with, but it will definitely be a contributing factor. At the conclusion of this meeting, we decided to scrap Wizards in Training and just keep the other two.
  • Finally, we had a meeting on Saturday, September 24, 2016 and thus starting our crunch time before our stage challenge on Monday.
  • The main thing we did was list our pros and cons for both Warm Fighter and My Prices Are More Than Fair. Our individual lists are as follows…
    • I felt that Warm Fighter was unique when it came to the “Warms” and that there was many different ways the game could go forward, but was worried about making each “warm” boss feel different, as well as a worry of it being too repetitive. For My Prices, I thought that it was a unique idea as a whole, but felt that the economy system would make the game more difficult to make, as well as the team still being unsure on how the player would level up.
    • Aaron felt that Warm Fighter would be easier to market, would use more animations (which is his forte), and is more fun, but thought it wasn’t too original with the challenge being “selling” the idea to teachers and classmates, as well as needing lots of polish. For My Prices, he liked how it is narrative heavy considering we have a narrative designer, and thinks this game can have a very comedic tone to it, but would be a lot of work on the art as it would require a lot of character models and 2D menu art.
    • Tony felt that Warm Fighter has a good aesthetic and is more fun, but it would require a lot of polish and is less innovative. For My Prices, he liked how it is a management game (due to being a fan of management games) and thinks it has a great hook, but feels like it needs a really good narrative and could end up being repetitive which is the challenge.
    • John felt that Warm Fighter fits more to his and Tony’s fields of systems/level design and thought playing the game would give players a good challenge, making the player wanting to kill each boss, but thought that because of the challenge, it’s not an easy game to test, as he noticed frustration with some testers which can possibly lead to negative feedback. He also believed that the idea isn’t as fleshed out as the team thinks, as he is still not sure what the full game loop is. He was also worried how well we can portray the viking culture, as the player’s character is a rust viking. For My Prices, he noticed how more testers leaned toward this idea and also pointed out in one of our early meetings, that all five of us put this on our list when we were narrowing down our 30 ideas. He also liked how this idea is not action-oriented, whereas most ideas on every other team is, which gives us the innovative edge that our professor is looking for. His cons were possibilities on player’s finding a dominant strategy, as well as the number of systems that need to be implemented and pointed out that a notoriety system would need to be added. He was also worried about getting the game to a level that would get it through to the spring semester.
    • Dmitri felt that Warm Fighter would be fun to play and can be picked up very quickly and it is easier to demonstrate to an audience. He also pointed out that there would be a lot of energy with the game due to its fast pace. It can also be prototyped and iterated on a lot quicker. His cons were that he has never worked with a boss mechanic at this scale, as well as adding in environmental hazards and obstacles, etc. which he found to be pretty daunting. He also thinks it is lacking systems and the idea needs more fleshing out. For My Prices, he liked how most testers enjoyed this game, as well as it having an edge over other teams in terms of innovation. He also thought a pro was that he would get to work with a bunch of systems working together, which is something he has never done, but something he would like to learn. The problems he has with the idea is that it’s a short window between now and the winter showcase, so he was worried if it could even be done enough to the point that we have a good vertical slice to show and that lots of testing would be needed. Another problem involves the pro of working with all the systems, as he has never done that before, which can slow down the game’s progress. He was also unsure about the game’s appeal, as he pointed out that most testers had their own ideas for how the game would look.
  • We then weighed our options, with Dmitri reading a Rationale Statement that he made, arguing his side for Warm Fighter which was a very good argument, bringing up a big point that it involves all the areas of work that we are studying. It has narrative (for Tony), animations (for Aaron), levels and systems (for John), etc.
  • Following this, a designer from a different team came in just to say hello, but then I came up with the idea to pitch the two ideas to him and get his opinion. He suggested that My Prices would be our best bet in terms of innovation and getting people to like the game, but Warm Fighter wouldn’t be as stressful to make and would still also be a good game. He also mentioned that for My Prices, there could be a deal screen where the player can sponsor a fledgling adventurer and in return the adventurer would go into the dungeons and get items for you. (We already had this idea, but didn’t have an incentive for the adventurer to do this for the player).
  • After still weighing the options, the team still finds itself stuck in the middle between the two ideas. There are good arguments for both sides and while 3 of the 5 wanted Warm Fighter, the decision is still unofficial. Next week is our final decision, stage challenge, and updates on whether our team successfully moved on to Deep Dive, or if we have to spend another week in Initial Concepts. Stay tuned for updates!

Progress Report (Week 3)

Hello everyone! The Capstone Crusaders are back again for Week 3 in our quest to make the greatest game we can possibly make…because we all like to pass our classes don’t we? Alright here are our updates for Week 3…

  • On Wednesday, September 14, 2016, we called an impromptu meeting as something VERY important needed to be addressed, which was our team cohesiveness. Half of the team was passionate and focused on one idea, while the other half was passionate and focused on another idea, while the 3rd idea was basically getting the back burner. We all came together, aired out our problems (Personally, I didn’t have any with anyone) and fixed them, and we are now a better team following this, and everyone is now focused on all three ideas equally.
  • Following this important discussion, we then moved on to talk about the aforementioned ideas (minus Warm Fighter) in order to flesh them out even more.
    • Dmitri mentioned his worries for Wizards in Training and My Prices Are More Than Fair which included that they need another mechanic for Wizards and the design and flow of the dungeons in My Prices. John responded with his ideas for the dungeon, stating, that it’d be simplistic and have skeletons (or something of the sort) for the player to wack and random loot drops. Basically something that can be implemented easily.
    • Dmitri suggested that we keep the player in the shop and have a tab system where you can send an NPC into the dungeon to retrieve loot for you.
    • Tony suggested the dungeons be more of a puzzle instead of a battle where the player rummages through things looking for loot instead of battling enemies and hoping they drop something.
    • We also discussed the merchant screen for My Prices as well such as art style and how it would flow. The customer would speak to the player requesting something based on a situation and the player trying to find an item in their inventory that best suits them, as well as attempting to price it to where you still make a profit.
    • After mentioning all of this, we decided it was best to hold off challenging Monday and instead challenging the next Monday so we can have an extra week to test and get everything ready.
    • Aaron suggested scrapping the dungeons altogether, and instead making the player able to roam around a 3D shop, while convincing AI to come into the shop to buy items.
  • We decided to call the meeting there since it isn’t our usual meeting time. We thought we made some good progress with our ideas.
  • Our usual Thursday meeting was still held as normal on September 15, 2016, where we took the time to show the team each of the three prototypes and further flesh out the ideas.
    • We started off the meeting by deciding to postpone the informal testing to either our Saturday or Sunday meeting (with a formal testing session for next week).
    • John then showed off the progress on his prototype for Wizards in Training and had a problem with part of the mechanic, which Dmitri fixed by taking off the collision.
    • John discussed the minute-to-minute gameplay for Wizards which is the player chooses a level, and then you fight enemies until you find a spell book. This will teach the player a new spell which can enable the player to fight enemies they couldn’t before and solve puzzles that they couldn’t solve before as well. John wanted it as a 3rd-person shooter since it would be easier to make.
    • Dmitri and Aaron pointed out the similarities between Wizards and The Legend of Zelda series, which John countered by saying that the RPG-aspects and progression set it apart from Zelda.
    • We then discussed the level progression and 3 paths for Wizards. There is a tutorial level to start out, which is the same for every player. Then, the player will choose one of the 3 paths to continue the game on. The player will stay on the same path throughout the entire game unless they do want to change paths. If they decide to change, they have to go back to the first level of that path, instead of (as an example) playing Level 2 of the Summoner, then going to Level 3 of the Battle Mage. The player would have to go to Level 1 of the Battle Mage if they switch (the tree is pictured below).
    • Continuing with the paths, it was also suggested that each level can also branch of in multiple directions. So, as an example, a player can continue on to the next level to learn a new spell, or decide to just upgrade existing spells (which is a separate path within the main path the player is on).
    • UI was then talked about, which the team felt their needs to be a health bar and mana bar (preferably in the top left corner). On the top middle of the screen would be the spell select (which would only appear if the player is trying to switch spells).
    • For puzzles, this was mentioned in a previous meeting, but John suggested that the Druid would have Divination-esque puzzles where they can see through doors. The Battle Mage would have more physical puzzles where they can hit things, and the Summoner would have ability to summon things to help them out.
    • For pace, John suggested each level would take about 5-10 minutes to be completed.
    • Dmitri suggested a different system where it’s more like a cluster instead of a talent tree, where the player would pick 6 abilities of 9 (numbers are just hypothetical) and then the game is different based on which abilities you pick. The tree would also have multiple tiers to level up. This would add more choice and replay value to the player.
    • John then suggested keeping the talent tree, with the side levels being the clusters, where the player can only choose a limited amount of side levels to do before they can move on to the next main level.
    • We then discussed what resources we would need for each idea if our team moves forward. For Wizards we believe another Systems Designer is needed, as well as 2 graphics programmers, and a visual effects artist or an environmental artist. For My Prices we would need an Audio Designer (but that would probably be needed for any idea), and a character artist. For Warm Fighter, we would need a systems designer and either a level designer or more of a general designer, an environmental, visual effects, or character artist and a graphics or AI programmer (or a networking programmer if we decide to have multiplayer).
    • We then discussed who we would like to work with by name (which said names will not be mentioned here).
  • The week was then concluded by having a work meeting where the team play-tested each prototype and attempted to break them. The lava worm boss in Warm Fighter we felt was shooting too much at the player at one time, and we thought the amount of damage the player took didn’t feel like the right amount as well. My Prices Are More Than Fair mainly had some minor bugs, and the player movement in Wizards in Training didn’t feel as smooth as we wanted it. So, all of these will try and be fixed as we get ready for our planned informal testing session tomorrow! Stay tuned for more updates!

Progress Report (Week 2)

The team made significant progress during Week 2, as we moved out of the Ideation/Brainstorming stage and into the Initial Concepts stage. Our next goal is to challenge out of this, and move into the Deep Dive stage by Monday, September 19, 2016. Our progress for this week are as follows…

  • The team had a meeting on Sunday, September 4, 2016, with the goal that each team member have 2 new ideas ready to pitch to the rest of the team (10 ideas). We exceeded expectations and had 14 new ideas for the day. Adding this to the 16 ideas we had at the previous meetings, our grand total is now at 30 ideas. The 14 new ideas are…
    • Idea #1 was monsters fighting each other in a sci-fi setting with turn-based combat (with Zelda-esque level design) involving dungeons to get tools.
    • Idea #2 RPG revolving around deciding what your actions are just based on looking at enemy on how their built (instead of stats).
    • Idea #3 is similar to Pogo Pandemonium from Crash Bash where the objective is to take over tiles. The tiles is a lawn and one player is a lawnmower that takes over tiles by cutting the grass, and the other player is a dog who poops in each tile to fertilize the grass to make it grow back.
    • Idea #4 is sad, but educational and involves a mama Polar Bear and her cub fighting to survive in the Arctic as their home is slowly melting away.
    • Idea #5 has the working title Pillow Plight and involves a pillow getting revenge on humans for wanting to have pillow fights instead of going to sleep. The main goal is to journey to the Pillow God (who’s throne is a nice king size bed) to convince him to use his mystical powers to make humans want to sleep again.
    • Idea #6 is a mind-flayer game where you have to nurture mother brain while defending against attackers. They can also save NPC’s but they can be controlled too.
    • Idea #7 is a stealth game where you play as a guard. The objective is to find the thief while working with/around other guards.
    • Idea #8 is a Battleship-esque game that is turn-based and involves choosing to attack a ship and having to set the weapons and judge the distance to the other ship.
    • Idea #9 is a turn-based game (with the illusion of real-time) like Simon where you can control time, using the correct actions in order to defeat enemies.
    • Idea #10 is similar to Pokemon Go but it involves LARP-ing.
    • Idea #11 is a no-combat game involving town villagers who have no idea how to deal with magical creatures/witches. The player is the “middle-man” between the two, helping each side out.
    • Idea #12 is Creature Platformer, top-down, where the player can mind-control a creature to help them solve puzzles, disarm traps, or defeat enemies. Mini-bosses can even be controlled.
    • Idea #13 2D platformer puzzle having the player construct machines to kill a bunny.
    • Idea #14 is called Heart of Balor (or Eye of Balor) and involves Balor from Irish mythology.
  • Now that we had enough ideas to continue on, each team member made a list of the five ideas that we liked most, and we wrote the ideas that had the most votes on the board. My Prices Are More Than Fair was on all 5 team members’ lists, with The Watcher (the game involving town villagers and witches with player being the “middle-man”) earning 4 votes. The game involving wizards and the character progression had 3 votes, and lastly, 5 ideas earning two votes each (casual horror+mind flayer, Warm Fighter, Mama Polar Bear in the melting Arctic, the turn-based game with an input mechanic, and the RPG where the player’s actions depend on the enemy’s look).
  • Following this, we further narrowed down our ideas to our final four, which we would present the next day in class. Our final four were The WatcherMy Prices Are More Than FairWizards in Training, and Warm Fighter.
  • After presenting the four ideas in class the next day, the team came together for a meeting on Thursday, September 8, 2016, to discuss basic concepts for each of the four ideas (i.e. narrative, mechanics, User Interface (UI), etc.). After briefly discussing The Watcher at the start, we decided the idea was too ambitious to be successfully completed enough to be eligible for presentation in December so we scrapped it and focused on the other three.
  • Succeeding this quick decision, the meeting was then resumed by having each team member shared what they did for the week.
    • Dmitri talked (argued) with Aaron over the Design for Warm Fighter and what mechanics were needed and made a basic prototype. Levels would be more arena-based and would include environmental hazards and puzzles.
    • John focused on design for all three ideas and wrote down notes and ideas for each.
    • Tony looked at the Wizards in Training and My Prices Are More Than Fair ideas and thought which one would be easier to prototype and analyzing what he would want to do.
    • AJ made a rough draft of a business document for My Prices Are More Than Fair which included a target market, marketing, and monetization, as well as a timeline and budget (all hypothetical).
    • Aaron talked (argued) with Dmitri over Warm Fighter. He also did a few pieces of concept art .
    • Following all this, we discussed Warm Fighter.
    • Aaron showed the team a mockup that he made that includes what the game would hypothetically look like in the end. It includes the player shooting a giant lava worm, as well as a health bar for the enemy and a heat bar (both at the bottom of the screen) that goes down the more the worm is attacked in succession which freezes the worm and can reward the player when depleted (like an execution mechanic). If the player tries to use this mechanic too early, it can cause the heat bar to fill back up and make the worm enraged (which during this mode, it can’t be frozen).
    • It has the player’s health bar in the top left corner.
    • Aaron suggested a perk system (i.e. Rage which makes the player move faster when health is low).
    • Environmental hazards suggested were lava jets and crevasses, etc.
    • The home base for Warm Fighter is a longship that would have a gun locker, etc. A crew was also suggested but hasn’t been decided on due to the amount of work that would be.
    • We then talked about My Prices Are More Than Fair.
    • John talked about his ideas for the primary objective which is to make money, and that is made by selling goods, and to sell goods, they have to be acquired. (It’s an endless cycle).
    • The end goal is to increase the player’s net worth.
    • One of John’s ideas is that the player goes from a back alley, sketchy salesman, to Jordan Belfort levels of wealth. The player would start selling things from a trenchcoat, then moving up to a cart, then a stall, shoppe, emporium, etc. This would be considered leveling up and it would be achieved when the net worth reaches certain numbers.
    • Goods can be acquired by exploring dungeons, and buying from suppliers.
    • The screen will have the shop counter with a line of customers. The player talks to customers trying to figure out which item in the player’s inventory would best suit their needs. The player tries to sell the customer the item by setting their own price, which the customer can refuse if the price is too high for their liking.
    • Certain customers can also sell the player a “mystery crate” which increases the player’s inventory, but you don’t know what items come in it (it also decreases your net worth if you decide to purchase it).
    • There is also a sabotaging system allowing the player to sabotage the competition to steal the goods, but over time it will cause net worth to go down the more the sabotage system is used (to prevent spamming).
    • The team then concluded by talking about Wizards in Training.
    • John shared that he thinks it would be (in terms of gameplay) like a generic 3rd person shooter that involves solving puzzles to find new spells, and learning how to use each spells.
    • For the three paths (Summoner, Battle Mage, and Druid), the Druid would have powers more toward Divination where they can see secret paths. The Summoner can do things like summon a shield, etc.
    • We then discussed puzzles and what exactly they would be. For the Druid it would be more like a maze, the Battle Mage would have melee puzzles, and the Summoner would have flamethrower traps.
  • Now that all three ideas have been fleshed out to an extent, the goal for class is to have prototypes for all three ideas (that have been tested in QA twice) in order to challenge into the Deep Dive stage. Once our meeting concluded, the team then got to work. We had our first Work Meeting on Saturday, September 10, 2016.
  • Stay tuned for more updates!

Intro/Progress Report (Week 1)

Hello fellow readers! My name is AJ Purnell and I am senior student at Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont, studying Management of Creative Media with a specialization in Video Game Production. Throughout this semester I will be posting updates on the development of my team and I’s work on our game. So without further ado, here are the updates for Week 1!

  • We had our first meeting on September 1, 2016 with the main goal of brainstorming ideas. Our goal was to create 30-50 ideas by the same time next week. How we went through our brainstorming process is that we did an activity where we wrote anything that we liked about games and/or things we would like to work on in a game (such as mechanics or genres).
  • Prior to this activity some of the team members already had pitches for ideas ready to go. Following the pitches and the activity the team collectively had six ideas listed below….
    • Idea #1 involved a top-down shooter called Warm Fighter which involves fight giant worms or “warms.” The con with this is that it is a very open idea that could go either a boss rush route or an arcade rpg style, as well as the scope of the project.
    • Idea #2 included a turn-based rpg with having user input based on the attacks as a main mechanic (i.e. Certain QuickTimes for certain attacks).
    • Idea #3 hasn’t been thought out too much but it would involve planes in a WW1 sci-fi type of game; even better if it was in VR.
    • Idea #4 involved wizards and a blended UI as a third person shooter. One of the big things with this idea is that the player will experience character growth and progression. Players complete a level and either get a new spell or upgrade a spell already learned. Learn spells on main path, and upgrade them on a side path. 3 Paths – Druid, Summoner, and Battle Mage. Each have own strengths and weaknesses. Main path for each class as well as side path(s) for each. The art style that was considered is vertex painting with the main character model drawing inspiration from Vivi from Final Fantasy and Gandalf the Grey. Cons with this idea is the third person shooter aspect as well as scope.
    • Idea #5 involves a fable where the player interacts with the world, with the story being pretty simple. As the player progresses they find out the story isn’t as simple, but starts to unravel of the events that happened prior to the game (such as how Ring Around a Rosie came from the Bubonic Plague). Basically there is more to the world than meets the eye.
    • Idea #6 is a first person involving tanks where each person commands there own tank. Not much has been thought about for this idea yet.
  • Meeting 1 was then concluded by setting up our Wiki page (the main hub for anything to do with our project(s)) and setting up the task board. We also named the team “Capstone Crusaders,” hence the name of this blog.
  • Meeting 2 took place on September 3, 2016 and the first portion was a team bonding session where we ate breakfast in the cafeteria and talked about gaming in general. The remainder of the meeting took place in a study room and the objective leading up to the meeting was to brainstorm some more and bring some more ideas to the table. The activity done at the last meeting was done again in order to get the brain waves functioning. We had 10 new ideas pitched/created bringing us to a total of 16. (New ideas listed below).
    • Idea #1 would be a horror-viking game, that ISN’T survival horror. The way the game is portrayed would have a horror aesthetic, but we then determined that it wouldn’t really be horror by that point.
    • Idea #2 involved being a viking captain and having to protect your men (i.e. resource management).
    • Idea #3 would be a first-person where you take care of your neighbors but sometimes you turn into a werewolf and end up killing everyone you love.
    • Idea #4 involves a casual horror where the player plays as the killer, but during the course of the day, he’s out and about like a normal person doing normal things.
    • Idea #5 is a post-apocalyptic merchant game, aesthetic in the frozen wastes, involving vikings wearing gas-masks.
    • Idea #6 was thought of beforehand and has the working title My Prices Are More Than Fair. You are a merchant who sells potions, weapons, etc. to adventurers. You can use ships to export and import merchandise, hire pirates to hijack ships with merchandise, use an alchemist to make certain potions for you, etc. You can also get more merchandise by exploring dungeons and looting dead adventurers. The cons are that it would need a lot of art assets, possible lack of narrative, and it’s a lot on the programming end.
    • Idea #7 is a 90s high school detective game where you’re an investigative reporter for your school paper.
    • Idea #8 is an arena sports game where you’re trying to get your ball to the goal but at random times there would be a modifier (i.e. no gravity, a giant boss appears and goes on a rampage).
    • Idea #9 is a space odyssey where you’re a galactic being that can survive in space where you can explore worlds and you use time and space to solve puzzles. You can also teleport and distort.
    • Idea #10 is an “Escape the room” game where you’re in a building (with multiple rooms) that’s a puzzle-adventure crafting game where you can craft items based on objects you find in order to help you escape.
  • The meeting was then concluded by having everyone brainstorm some more and have at least 2 ideas each to share for the next meeting. Stay tuned for more updates!